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Species At Risk

Amphibians
Birds
Insects
Mammals
Reptiles

Birds at Risk

Common Name: Barn Swallow

Scientific Name: Hirundo rustica

Barn Swallow - Hirundo rustica- Bill_Hubick - Species at Risk
Photo by Bill Hubic

Provincial Status: Threatened
Federal Status: Threatened

Habitat: These birds almost always build their nests on man-made structures such as barns, under bridges, and in culverts. 

Main Threats: Loss of available nesting sites.


Common Name: Bobolink

Scientific Name: Dolichonyx oryzivorus

Bobolink_Kristen_Mancus -Dolichonyx oryzivorus - Species at Risk
Photo by Kristen Mancus

Provincial Status: Threatened
Federal Status: Threatened

Habitat: Historically, these brids have been known to nest in tallgrass parairie and open meadows, but with the loss of these habitats, they have taken to nesting in hayfields.

Main Threats: During the breeding season, Bobolinks are often killed, or the mowing of hayfields destroys their nests, eggs and/or young.


Common Name: Canada Warbler

Scientific Name: Cardellina Canadensis

Canada_Warbler_Jeff_Lewis-Species at Risk
Photo by Jeff Lewis

Provincial Status: Special Concern
Federal Status: Threatened

Habitat: These birds are known to breed on both coniferous and deciduous forests, all with well-established shrub layers to conceal their nests from predators.

Main Threats: Loss of habitat through the harvesting of forests for timber or agricultural land.


Common Name: Common Nighthawk

Scientific Name: Chordeiles minor

Common_Nighthawk_Bill_Hubick-Species at Risk
Photo by Bill Hubick

Provincial Status: Special Concern
Federal Status: Threatened

Habitat: Common Nighthawks can be found in open areas including gravel roads, forest openings, rock barrens, bogs, railways and mine tailings.

Main Threats: The main threat to these birds is the decline in insects, their main prey, due to the intensified use of insecticides. Additionally, there has been an increase in nest predation due to domestic predators such as cats, striped skinks, American Crows, and raccoons.


Common Name: Eastern Meadowlark

Scientific Name: Sturnella magna

Eastern Meadowlark-Bill Hubick Species at Risk
Photo by Bill Hubick

Provincial Status: Threatened
Federal Status: Threatened

Habitat: Eastern Meadowlarks build their nests in hayfields and pastures.

Main Threats: Similar to Bobolinks, they are often killed, or their nests, eggs, and/or young are destroyed by the mowing of hayfields during the breeding season.


Common Name: Eastern Whip-poor-will

Scientific Name: Caprimulgus vociferous


Photo by Jerry Oldenettel

Provincial Status: Threatened
Federal Status: Threatened

Habitat: Eastern Whip-poor-wills are often found in areas with both open and forested spots, such as savannas, and deciduous or coniferous forests.

Main Threats: Habitat loss through forest destruction for agriculture, and habitat degradation due to the natural closure of forest openings through vegetation encroachment.


Common Name: Golden-winged Warbler

Scientific Name: Vermivora chrysoptera

Golden Winged Warbler - Gene - Species at Risk
Photo by Gene

Provincial Status: Special Concern
Federal Status: Threatened

Habitat: Golden-winged Warblers often nest in young shrubs around mature forests, and around the shrubby perimeters of fields and other disturbed sites.

Main Threats: Habitat loss is the main threat to this species.


Common Name: Henslow’s Sparrow

Scientific Name: Ammodramus henslowii

Henslow's Sparrow-Alex Burdo-Species at Risk
Photo by Alex Burdo

Provincial Status: Endangered
Federal Status: Endangered

Habitat: The Henslow's Sparrow occupies both natural and man-made fields and pastures containing a mix of shrubs, tall grasses, and wild flowers. They are not currently found at Alderville Black Oak Savanna (ABOS) but as we continue to build large tallgrass prairie habitat, they will come.

Main Threats: Habitat loss throughout the development of fields for residential areas or agriculture is the main threat to this species.


Common Name: Loggerhead Shrike

Scientific Name: Lanius ludovicianus

Loggerhead Shrike Barry Noret Species at Risk
Photo by Barry Noret

Habitat: This species lives in fields that contain shrubs and trees, where it can perch and spot prey easily.

Provincial Status: Endangered
Federal Status: Endangered

Main Threats: The Loggerhead Shrike is threatened by loss of grassland habitat to the development of these areas to agricultural fields. Additionally since they often hunt from trees that grow along roadsides, they are often killed in collisions with cars.


Common Name: Olive-sided Flycatcher

Scientific Name: Contopus cooperi

Olive Sided Flycatcher Henry Trombley Species at Risk
Photo by Henry Trombley

Provincial Status: Special Concern
Federal Status: Threatened

Habitat: Olive-sided Flycatchers are commonly found in coniferous and deciduous forests with openings or clearing in which they can spot the insect prey.

Main Threats: The most likely threats to this species are forest loss and the decline in their insect prey.


Common Name: Red-headed Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes erythrocephalus

Red Headed Woodpecker Bill Hubick Species at Risk
Photo by Bill Hubick

Provincial Status: Special Concern
Federal Status: Threatened

Habitat: The Red-headed Woodpecker is commonly found in open areas such as woodland openings, forest edges, golf courses, and cemeteries, as these areas tend to contain dead trees which these birds use for nesting and foraging for prey.

Main Threats: Forestry and agriculture are the main causes of this species' decline, in addition to the removal of dead trees from forested areas.


Common Name: Wood Thrush

Scientific Name: Hylocichla mustelina

Wood Thrush Rebecca Brooks
Photo by Rebecca Brooks

Provincial Status: currently under evaluation
Federal Status: Threatened

Habitat: Wood Thrushes breed in large, mixed forests with a thick understory composed of moss, shrubs, and mushrooms.

Main Threats: Habitat loss due to deforestation is the biggest threat to this species.


Common Name: Short-eared Owl

Scientific Name: Asio flammeus


Photo by Bill Hubick

Provincial Status: Special Concern
Federal Status: n/a

Habitat: This species is commonly found in open areas, where it nests on the ground and hunts for small terrestrial mammals such as voles. They are not currently found at ABOS but as we continue to build large tallgrass prairie habitat, they will come.

Main Threats: The loss of open grasslands to the development of agricultural fields where intensive mowing occurs threatens this species, as the mowing destroys their nest and kills their young.