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Species At Risk

Amphibians
Birds
Insects
Mammals
Reptiles

Mammals at Risk

Common Name: Woodland Vole

Scientific Name: Microtus pinetorum

Woodland Vole - Patrick Connolly - Mammals at Risk
Photo by Patrick Connolly

Provincial Status:Special Concern
Federal Status: Special Concern

Habitat: This species specializes in burrowing the deep litter layer in deep deciduous forests characteristic of Ontario's Carolinian region.

Main Threats: : The main threat to this species is habitat loss through the conversion of their natural habitat to farmland. Their populations are very vulnerable and take a very long time to re-stabilize.


Common Name: Tri-colored Bat

Scientific Name: Perimyotis subflavus

Tri Coloured bat USFWS Mammals at Risk
Photo by USFWS

Provincial Status: Not yet evaluated
Federal Status: Endangered

Habitat:

Main Threats: White Nose Syndrome is a fungal disease that is spreading throughout places where bats hibernate, causing them to wake early from their hibernation, and to use up all of their fat and energy stores before it is warm enough for them to find food again. This leads to their death, and a very severe population decline.


Common Name: Little Brown Bat

Scientific Name: Myotis lucifugus

Little Brown Bat Dan D'Auria Species at Risk
Photo by Dan D’Auria

Provincial Status: Endangered
Federal Status: Endangered

Habitat: Being nocturnal, these bats spend the daytime roosting in trees and buildings, and fly around at night hunting for insect prey. In winter they hibernate in caves and abandoned mines.

Main Threats: White Nose Syndrome is a fungal disease that is spreading throughout places where bats hibernate, causing them to wake early from their hibernation, and to use up all of their fat and energy stores before it is warm enough for them to find food again. This leads to their death, and a very severe population decline.


Common Name: Northern Myotis

Scientific Name: Myotis septentrionalis

Northern Myotis Photo by USFWS Mammals at Risk
Photo by USFWS

Provincial Status: Endangered
Federal Status: n/a

Habitat: These bats are common in boreal forests, and roost under the loose bark of trees. They spend the winter hibernating in caves and abandoned mines.

Main Threats: White Nose Syndrome is a fungal disease that is spreading throughout places where bats hibernate, causing them to wake early from their hibernation, and to use up all of their fat and energy stores before it is warm enough for them to find food again. This leads to their death, and a very severe population decline.